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Archives May 2013

Water Scape – Kumarakam Kerala

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Category: PREMIUM BACWATER RESORT

Kumarakom – endless backwater charm

The backwater village of Kumarakom in Kottayam district shot into fame with Arundhati Roy’s Booker prize winning book – The God of Small Things. Kumarakom offers one of the most unforgettable experiences for travelers. Houseboats, picture-book villages, secluded coves, lagoons and the rich flora and fauna of the mangrove ecosystem in the famed Kumarakom Bird Sanctuary make it a truly distinct destination.

Waterscapes – tune into the backwater lullaby

Waterscapes – this exotic backwater resort, on the shores of Vembanad Lake is located inside the Kumarakom Bird Sanctuary, which draws migratory birds from as far away as Siberia. The only resort in the destination located inside the bird sanctuary and is noted for its independent huts that stand on stilts and is a place teeming with mangrove vegetation. It offers its guests uninterrupted access to the backwater life of Kumarakom. It is also an interesting location for eco tourists who are interested in mangrove ecosystem, birds related ecosystem.

The property is part of the original Kavanattinkara estate once owned by Alfred George Baker. It is also widely popular among the “honeymooners”.

Facilities

  • Ayurveda therapies
  • Swimming pool
  • Restaurant
  • Beer Parlor
  • Ayurvedic centre
  • Conference hall
  • Boating
  • Backwater tours
  • Sightseeing trips
  • Car hire
  • Currency exchange
  • Laundry
  • Amphitheatre

Room Types

  • Superior Lake Front – 04
  • Lake view – 05
  • Canal view – 31
  • Total – 40

Conference Options

  • Theatre
  • Classroom
  • ‘U’ Shape
  • Lawn

Contact Us

For Reservations

Waterscapes (KTDC)

KTDC Backwater Resort

Kumarakom North, Kottayam – 686563, Kerala, India

Phone: +91-481-2525861, 2524258

Fax: +91-481-2525862

E-mail: waterscapes@ktdc.com

Website: www.ktdc.com

For specific assistance :

Assistant Manager (Front Office) +91-94000 08621

Assistant Manager (Food & Beverage) +91-94000 08622

General Manager +91-94000 08620

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Sri Padmanabha Swami Temple – Kerala

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              SREE PADMANABHASWAMI TEMPLE – PANORAMIC VIEW – CLICK HERE

          Sree Padmanabhaswamy temple is a Hindu temple dedicated to Lord Vishnu located in Thiruvananthapuram, India. The shrine is run by a trust headed by the royal family of Travancore. The temple is one of 108 Divya Desams (Holy Abodes of Vishnu) – principal centres of worship of the deity in Vaishnavism. Lord Balarama, according to Srimad Bhagavatam (10.79.18), visited Phalgunam (now known as Thiruvananthapuram) as part of his teerthyatra, took bath in Panchapsaras (Padmatirtham) and made a gift of ten thousand cows to holy men. The temple is glorified in the Divya Prabandha, the early medieval Tamil literature canon of the Tamil Alvar saints (6th–9th centuries CE), with structural additions to it made throughout the 16th century CE, when its ornate Gopuram was constructed. The Temple is a replica of the famous Sri Adikesavaperumal Temple at Thiruvattar Sri Padmanabhaswamy Temple gave its name to Kerala’s state capital Thiruvananthapuram. ‘Thiru’ ‘Anantha’ ‘Puram’ means Sacred Abode of Lord Anantha Padmanabha. The city was also known as Anandapuram (City of Bliss) and Syananduram (Where Bliss is not far off). Ananda refers to Sree Padmanabha Himself. Hindu scriptures refer to the Supreme Being as ‘Sachidananda’ (Absolute Truth, Absolute Consciousness and Absolute Bliss). Now it’s one of the richest temples in the world  and  considered wealthier than Sri Thirumala Venkateswara Swamy temple in Andhra Pradesh. There was a public outcry when the current descendent of the erstwhile Kingdom attempted to retain the control of the temple by citing the special law. Many argued that the wealth belonged to the people now.  A review of the temple’s underground vaults was undertaken by a seven-member panel appointed by the Supreme Court of India estimated 1,00,000 crores  Rupees worth. Considering that the committee takes in to account its value based on ancient and historical facts the value of the treasure will be approximately ten times to the value estimated right now. Treasure includes ancient gold chains, diamonds, rubies and precious stones, silver vessels, and gold statues the value of which is humanly impossible to evaluate in terms of money.

The Sree Padmanabhaswamy temple in Thiruvananthapuram is really a among most popular sacred abode of Vaishnava temples in India.It’s also among the seven Parasurama Kshetras (temples) in Kerala.The main city  that is named following the Lord. ‘Thiru’ ‘Anantha’ ‘Puram’ means sacred abode of Lord Anantha Padmanabha. Brahma Purana, Padma Purana, Varaha Purana, Skanda Purana and Vayu Purana have references about the temple. Divya Prabandha canon of literature compiled by the Alvars, Tamil saint poets glorifies the temple among the 11 Divya Desams in Kerala. Nammalvar, among the 12 Alvars who lived within the 8th century had composed four slokas and something phalasruthi about the temple.

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Lotus Temple – Bahai Temple – New Delhi

Lotus Temple – A Panoramic ViewCLICK HERE

           The Lotus Temple, located in New Delhi, India, is a Bahai House of Worship completed in 1986. Notable for its flower like shape, it serves as the Mother Temple of the Indian subcontinent and has become a prominent attraction in the city. East of Nehru place, this temple is built in the shape of a lotus flower and is the last of seven Major Bahai’s temples built around the world. Completed in 1986 it is set among the lush green landscaped gardens. The Lotus Temple has won numerous architectural awards and been featured in hundreds of newspaper and magazine articles.

Since its inauguration to public worship in December 1986, the Bahai House of Worship in Delhi has, as of late 2002, attracted more than 50 million visitors, making it one of the most visited buildings in the world. Its numbers of visitors during those years surpassed those of the Eiffel Tower and the Taj Mahal. On Hindu celebrative days and holy days, it has drawn as many as 150,000 people.

This House of Worship is generally referred to as the “Lotus Temple”. In India, during the Hindu festival Durga Puja, several times a replica of the Lotus Temple has been made as a pandal, a temporary structure set up to venerate the goddess Durga. In Sikkim a permanent replica is of the Hindu Legship Mandir, dedicated to Shiva.

India Gate

INDIA GATE – A PANORAMIC VIEWCLICK HERE

                       The India Gate is the national monument of India. Situated in the heart of New Delhi, it was designed by Sir Edwin Lutyens. India Gate is one of the most renowned places that are also considered as one of the national monuments that are built in India.
Built in 1931, the monument was inspired by the Arc de Triomphe in Paris, which in turn was inspired by the Roman Arch of Titus. Originally known as the All India War Memorial, it is a prominent landmark in Delhi and commemorates the 90,000 soldiers of the British Indian Army who lost their lives in World War I and the Third Anglo-Afghan War. It is composed of red and pale sandstone and granite. The monument combines within just the red as well as pale sandstone and apart from that granite has also been used in construction process.
Originally, a statue of George V, Emperor of India stood under the now vacant canopy in front of the India Gate, but it was removed to Coronation Park together with a number of other British Raj-era statues. Following India’s independence, the India Gate became the site of the Indian Army’s Tomb of the Unknown Soldier, known as Amar Jawan Jyoti (“the flame of the immortal soldier”).

Tajmahal in India

                 TAJMAHAL – A PANORAMIC  VIEWCLICK HERE

           The Taj Mahal incorporates and expands on design traditions of Persian architecture and earlier Mughal architecture. Specific inspiration came from successful Timurid and Mughal buildings including; the Gur-e Amir (the tomb of Timur, progenitor of the Mughal dynasty, in Samarkand), Humayun’s Tomb, Itmad-Ud-Daulah’s Tomb (sometimes called the Baby Taj), and Shah Jahan’s own Jama Masjid in Delhi. While earlier Mughal buildings were primarily constructed of red sandstone, Shah Jahan promoted the use of white marble inlaid with semi-precious stones, and buildings under his patronage reached new levels of refinement.

            The tomb is the central focus of the entire complex of the Taj Mahal. This large, white marble structure stands on a square plinth and consists of a symmetrical building with an iwan (an arch-shaped doorway) topped by a large dome and finial. Like most Mughal tombs, the basic elements are Persian in origin.

            The base structure is essentially a large, multi-chambered cube with chamfered corners, forming an unequal octagon that is approximately 55 metres (180 ft) on each of the four long sides. On each of these sides, a huge pishtaq, or vaulted archway, frames the iwan with two similarly shaped, arched balconies stacked on either side. This motif of stacked pishtaqs is replicated on the chamfered corner areas, making the design completely symmetrical on all sides of the building. Four minarets frame the tomb, one at each corner of the plinth facing the chamfered corners. The main chamber houses the false sarcophagi of Mumtaz Mahal and Shah Jahan; the actual graves are at a lower level.

More Details Please Visit  –  CLICK HERE

Ayurveda – Life of Knowledge

                 Ayurveda, Yoga – A PANORAMIC VIDEO VIEW – CLICK HERE

               Ayurveda ( “life-knowledge”) or ayurvedic medicine is a system of traditional medicine native to the Indian subcontinent and a form of alternative medicine. The oldest known ayurvedic texts are the Suśruta Saṃhitā and the Charaka Saṃhitā. These Classical Sanskrit encyclopedias of medicine are among the foundational and formally compiled works of ayurveda.

By the medieval period, ayurvedic practitioners developed a number of medicinal preparations and surgical procedures for the treatment of various ailments. Current practices derived (or reportedly derived) from ayurvedic medicine are regarded as part of complementary and alternative medicine, and, along with siddha and Traditional Chinese medicine, form the basis for systems medicine.

Safety concerns have been raised about Ayurveda; for instance, two U.S. studies found that about 20 percent of Ayurvedic Indian-manufactured patent medicines sold via internet contained toxic levels of heavy metals such as lead, mercury and arsenic. Other concerns include the use of herbs containing toxic compounds and the lack of quality control in Ayurvedic facilities.

In classical Sanskrit literature, Ayurveda was called “the science of eight components”, a classification that became canonical for ayurveda.

According to some sources up to 80 percent of people in India use some form of traditional medicines, a category which includes Ayurveda. In 1970, the Indian Medical Central Council Act which aims to standardize qualifications for ayurveda and provide accredited institutions for its study and research was passed by the Parliament of India. In India, over 100 colleges offer degrees in traditional ayurvedic medicine. The Indian government supports research and teaching in ayurveda through many channels at both the national and state levels, and helps institutionalize traditional medicine so that it can be studied in major towns and cities.The state-sponsored Central Council for Research in Ayurvedic Sciences (CCRAS) has been set up to research the subject. To fight biopiracy and unethical patents, the Government of India, in 2001, set up the Traditional Knowledge Digital Library as repository of 1200 formulations of various systems of Indian medicine, such as ayurveda, unani and siddha. The library also has 50 traditional ayurveda books digitized and available online. Central Council of Indian Medicine (CCIM) a statutory body established in 1971, under Department of Ayurveda, Yoga and Naturopathy, Unani, Siddha and Homoeopathy (AYUSH), Ministry of Health and Family Welfare, Government of India, monitors higher education in ayurveda. Many clinics in urban and rural areas are run by professionals who qualify from these institutes.

Tourist Attractions in India

            Tourism in India is a large industry. The World Travel and Tourism Council calculated that tourism generated $121 billion or 6.4% of the nation’s GDP in 2011. It was responsible for 39,3 million jobs, 7.9% of its total employment. The GDP of the tourism sector has expanded 229% between 1990 and 2011. The sector is predicted to grow at an average annual rate of 7,7% in the next decade. In a 2011 forecast the World Travel and Tourism Council predicted the annual growth to be 8,8% between 2011 and 2021. This gave India the fifth rank among countries with the fastest growing tourism industry. India has a large medical tourism sector which is expected to grow at an estimated rate of 30% annually to reach about ₹ 9,500crore by 2015.

In the year 2011, there were nearly 6.29 million foreign tourist arrivals in India, up by over 8% from the year 2010 when 5.78 million foreign tourists arrived in India. Domestic tourist visits to all states and Union Territories numbered 747.70 million. The majority of foreign tourists come from the United States (16%) and the United Kingdom (12,6%). In 2011 Maharashtra, Tamil Nadu and Delhi were the most popular states for foreign tourists. Domestic tourists visited the states Uttar Pradesh, Andhra Pradesh and Tamil Nadu most frequently. Chennai, Delhi, Mumbai and Agra have been the four most visited cities of India by foreign tourists during the year 2011. Worldwide, Chennai is ranked 41 by the number of foreign tourists, while Delhi is ranked at 50, Mumbai at 57 and Agra at 65.

The Travel & Tourism Competitiveness Report 2011 ranked the price competitiveness of India’s tourism sector 28th out of 139 countries. It mentions that India has quite good air transport (ranked 39th), particularly given the country’s stage of development, and reasonable ground transport infrastructure (ranked 43rd). Some other aspects of its tourism infrastructure remain somewhat underdeveloped however. The nation has very few hotel rooms per capita by international comparison and low ATM penetration. The Indian government has identified a shortage of 150,000 hotel rooms, with most of the under supply in the budget sector.

The Ministry of Tourism designs national policies for the development and promotion of tourism. In the process, the Ministry consults and collaborates with other stakeholders in the sector including various Central Ministries/agencies, state governments, Union Territories and the representatives of the private sector. Concerted efforts are being made to promote new forms of tourism such as rural, cruise, medical and Eco-tourism. The Ministry also maintains the Incredible India campaign.

India’s rich history and its cultural and geographical diversity make its international tourism appeal large and diverse. It presents heritage and cultural tourism along with medical, business and sports tourism.